What’s The difference? How to rock a TV and radio interview

As seen in Commpro.bizRegardless if you’re live on the radio or on TV, everything you say must be engaging and dynamic. However, the devil is in the details of the delivery. For instance, when you are being interviewed on radio, your vocal inflections and tone play a more crucial role, as it is the only way to connect with the audience.

Radio interviews slightly differ in terms of format. For instance, don’t get caught-off guard by the spirit of the “shock jock.” Given that radio needs content to capture the audience – think Howard Stern – the radio host might feel more empowered to go rogue to attract listeners. As the interviewee, it’s best to be on your toes and prepared for off the cuff questions.

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How’s that New Year’s Resolution Going?

Did you know that only 8% of the American population will stick with their New Year’s resolution for the entire year? New Year’s resolutions have become the motivation for goal setting and typically include dieting & exercising more or dropping a bad habit like smoking. But what about setting a professional development goal like learning a new skill or overcoming a fear like public speaking?

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How to deal with a “frienemy” in the media – Media training

Before the Iowa caucus, the news was peppered with Donald Trump’s decision not to participate in the last republican debate. His reason: He said the reporter chosen to moderate the show had been unfair to him with her questions in a previous debate.

While there is much discussion as to whether his “no show” decision will hurt his campaign, the incident begs a question in the larger context of public relations and media relations: How do you handle an interview with a reporter you believe is using “gotcha journalism” tactics?

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Don’t try to MacGyver your way out of a crisis

Remember MacGyver? If that does not ring a bell with you, here is MacGyver 101: Angus MacGyver was a secret agent known for his uncanny abilities to heroically overcome crises’ by “winging it” and always return unscathed the following week.

In the real world, companies and organizations can find themselves in a crisis situation at any moment, but that is not the time to pull a MacGyver and “wing it.” Protecting and saving an organization’s reputation is a delicate, communication balancing act that requires preparation and skill. The most essential item when planning for a crisis is a well-thought-out crisis communication plan that can be put into place quickly.

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Engaging your audience thru silence

We’ve all been there: Stuck in a meeting where the presenter has drifted-off on a tangent, and seems to be rambling on for hours. They have completely lost your attention, and the following thoughts have crossed your mind:

  1. Why are they still talking?
  2. What is the point? Just get to it!
  3. I could have spent this time better!
  4. Could someone please pull the fire alarm so we can get out of here?
  5. You’ve tuned out, and no one can blame you.

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The pressures on: Three tips to deliver a presentation to a large audience cooly, credibly and without boring everyone

While watching the President’s State of the Union address a couple of weeks ago, I was reminded of the many times I have worked with CEOs to deliver their annual “State of the Company” addresses. In both cases, there is an exorbitant amount of pressure to deliver often complex and substantive information in a way that everyone listening can understand and relate. All attention is on you: eyes and ears eager to hear your perspective on the organization. If you fail to inspire, you could negatively impact future business, sales opportunities, and investor confidence. Or, if you ignore the elephant in the room, or overpromise and under deliver, you run the risk of losing employee loyalty. No pressure, right?

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Eco-Friendly Events in Washington DC

French Embassy to US and British American Business Association (BABA) Hosting Energy and Environmental Events in Washington, DC

(Washington, D.C.) The French Embassy to the U.S. and the British American Business Association’s (BABA) Energy and Environmental Committee are hosting two separate events in the coming weeks to draw attention to the growing need for sustainable energy resources and environmental practices. These events are a prelude to COP21, the international conference on climate change in December 2015 in Paris, France.

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The Importance of Having a Crisis Communications Plan in Place for Emergency Management for Business

Crisis communications is often ignored by businesses until – quite suddenly – a public relations emergency erupts in the media, creating havoc with business bottom lines, personnel and brand recognition.

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BABA Hosts Luncheon November 12

ABA Hosts Luncheon in Washington D.C., Carmie McCook Invited Robert Hilton to Speak About Clean Energy and Sustainability Issues

BABA(Washington, D.C.)  The British American Business Association (BABA) will host an event, “Energy, Environment and the Power Industry – What’s a Company to Do?” featuring a talk by Robert Hilton, Vice President of Power Technologies for Government Affairs, ALSTOM Power Inc.   The BABA luncheon begins at 12 noon on November 12th, 2014, at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP, 700 Sixth Street, NW, Suite 700 in Washington D.C.  Hilton’s presentation occurs at 12:30 p.m.  The event is complimentary for BABA members and costs $20 for non-members.

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Piers Morgan’s Big Win: Christine O’Donnell Earns an “F” for Walking Off a CNN Interview and into a Firestorm

As seen in Commpro.bizIt has happened many times before, but the trend seems to be growing lately. Recently, rapper/singer Chris Brown did it on Good Morning America. Paris Hilton did it to ABC news reporter, Dan Harris. Sarah Ferguson did it on the Australian version of 60 Minutes. And, last week former Tea Party Senatorial candidate, Christine O’Donnell did it on CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight.
“It” is walking out of an interview because reporters asked them questions they obviously did not want to answer. Not a cool move, folks. The reporter, unless he or she has been a completely unprofessional louse, will always win. The “walker” will always be viewed as a coward with something to hide.

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